First draft song titles

Jul 24

discoverynews:

The Pale Blue Dot: Here’s Looking At Us, Earthlings
For a cosmic rendition of seeing the proverbial forest, rather than the trees, take a look at Earth from the perspective of the Saturn-orbiting Cassini spacecraft. From nearly 900 million miles away, Earth is just a dot of light and the moon is even smaller. Read more

discoverynews:

The Pale Blue Dot: Here’s Looking At Us, Earthlings

For a cosmic rendition of seeing the proverbial forest, rather than the trees, take a look at Earth from the perspective of the Saturn-orbiting Cassini spacecraft. From nearly 900 million miles away, Earth is just a dot of light and the moon is even smaller. Read more

(via n-a-s-a)

Jul 09

historyofcool:

The new cool. Pictures of space, snapped from a ground telescope.http://bit.ly/1b7B8vI

historyofcool:

The new cool. Pictures of space, snapped from a ground telescope.

http://bit.ly/1b7B8vI

Jun 11

distant-traveller:

Infrared Andromeda

This wide, detailed Spitzer Space Telescope view features infrared light from dust (red) and old stars (blue) in Andromeda, a massive spiral galaxy a mere 2.5 million light-years away. In fact, with over twice the diameter of our own Milky Way, Andromeda is the largest nearby galaxy. Andromeda’s population of bright young stars define its sweeping spiral arms in visible light images, but here the infrared view clearly follows the lumpy dust lanes heated by the young stars as they wind even closer to the galaxy’s core. Constructed to explore Andromeda’s infrared brightness and stellar populations, the full mosaic image is composed of about 3,000 individual frames. Two smaller companion galaxies, NGC 205 (below) and M32 (above) are also included in the combined fields.

Image credit: Pauline Barmby (Harvard-Smithsonian CfA) et al., JPL, Caltech, NASA

distant-traveller:

Infrared Andromeda

This wide, detailed Spitzer Space Telescope view features infrared light from dust (red) and old stars (blue) in Andromeda, a massive spiral galaxy a mere 2.5 million light-years away. In fact, with over twice the diameter of our own Milky Way, Andromeda is the largest nearby galaxy. Andromeda’s population of bright young stars define its sweeping spiral arms in visible light images, but here the infrared view clearly follows the lumpy dust lanes heated by the young stars as they wind even closer to the galaxy’s core. Constructed to explore Andromeda’s infrared brightness and stellar populations, the full mosaic image is composed of about 3,000 individual frames. Two smaller companion galaxies, NGC 205 (below) and M32 (above) are also included in the combined fields.

Image credit: Pauline Barmby (Harvard-Smithsonian CfA) et al., JPL, Caltech, NASA

(via n-a-s-a)

Jun 03

May 27

nedhepburn:

“A photograph that inspired countless young men to hunch their shoulders, look distant, and let the girl do the clinging,” The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan turns 50 today. 

nedhepburn:

“A photograph that inspired countless young men to hunch their shoulders, look distant, and let the girl do the clinging,” The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan turns 50 today

May 22

nedhepburn:

latimes:

How to solve world hunger with pizza
The idea of a universal food synthesizer sounds like something straight out of the Jetsons or Star Trek, but thanks to a $125,000 grant from NASA, a 3-D food printer may become a reality.
Anjan Contractor, a senior mechanical engineer at Systems and Materials Research Corporation, is already working on bringing the idea to fruition.
NASA’s interested because storing the various ingredients as a power greatly extends their shelf life for lengthy travel through space, but Contractor wants to keep all of the recipes open source, so the general public could eventually benefit as well.
So how will the pizza be made?

Pizza will be one of the first items printed because of its natural layers of ingredients. First, a layer of dough will be printed and baked at the same time using a heated plate at the bottom of the printer. A layer of tomato base will follow — made of powder, water and oil — then a protein layer will top the pizza.

Read more over at the Daily Dish.
Photo: Cheryl A. Guerrero / Glendale News Press

 ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

nedhepburn:

latimes:

How to solve world hunger with pizza

The idea of a universal food synthesizer sounds like something straight out of the Jetsons or Star Trek, but thanks to a $125,000 grant from NASA, a 3-D food printer may become a reality.

Anjan Contractor, a senior mechanical engineer at Systems and Materials Research Corporation, is already working on bringing the idea to fruition.

NASA’s interested because storing the various ingredients as a power greatly extends their shelf life for lengthy travel through space, but Contractor wants to keep all of the recipes open source, so the general public could eventually benefit as well.

So how will the pizza be made?

Pizza will be one of the first items printed because of its natural layers of ingredients. First, a layer of dough will be printed and baked at the same time using a heated plate at the bottom of the printer. A layer of tomato base will follow — made of powder, water and oil — then a protein layer will top the pizza.

Read more over at the Daily Dish.

Photo: Cheryl A. Guerrero / Glendale News Press

 ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

May 19

[video]

May 11

[video]

May 10

I’ll give you the most logical conclusion kids are ditching Facebook—one that none of the articles I read on the Great Teenage Facebook Exodus mentioned. And the evidence that supports the theory is right there in the Piper Jaffray survey. But first let’s define Facebook.

What is Facebook to most people over the age of 25? It’s a never-ending class reunion mixed with an eternal late-night dorm room gossip session mixed with a nightly check-in on what coworkers are doing after leaving the office. In other words, it’s a place where you go to keep tabs on your friends and acquaintances.

You know what kids call that? School.

” —

Cliff Watson.

(via nedhepburn)

(Source: soupsoup, via nedhepburn)

May 09

historyofcool:

We had a photographer come in to shoot black and white photos of the studio! Dig out those dusty albums and share with us your old black and white photos!

historyofcool:

We had a photographer come in to shoot black and white photos of the studio! Dig out those dusty albums and share with us your old black and white photos!